Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

raven boys cover imageSummary: Every teenager is weird. Blue Sargent is just a bit weirder. First off, her name is Blue. She lives in a house full of psychics or feminists or both, most likely both. And she’s been told as long as she can recall that she has a curse on her: if she kisses her true love, he’ll die. Of course, by the time the story rolls around, Blue’s decided she’d never going to fall in love. But then she sees a spirit. And even though she lives in a houseful of psychics, she’s never had any sort of supernatural visions of her own. The spirit is the ghost of a boy who goes to the local private school, Aglionby Academy—a raven boy. She gets his name: Gansey. And then Blue goes on the hunt to warn him, because before the year ends, Gansey is going to die. Gansey, the son of old Virginia money, is much more than he seems. Sure, he has pocket change the size of Blue’s college fund, but he’s on a quest to find the Welsh king Glendower, who sleeps in the Virginia hills, waiting to be woken. There is a reward for the one who wakes him: one wish. The story tracks Blue as she meets Gansey and his circle of raven boys: Adam, a private school boy who isn’t made of money, Ronan, who has a secret that’s eating him up from the inside, and Noah, who is much more than he seems. Altogether, the story involves magic, curses, helicopters, guns, ghosts, visions, and murders. Not in that order. Blue learns about her past, Gansey about his king, and at the end, they all learn the meaning of sacrifice. Because to wake the sleeping king, someone has to die.

Why I picked it up: The name on the cover was the first factor. Maggie Stiefvater. She wrote one of my favorite books, The Scorpio Races. There was some pretty cover art: painting of a raven, an interesting symbol. It didn’t seem like the shelves of books with covers of girls in prom dresses, so I could walk around with this book and not be ashamed of the cover. The plotline seemed odd from the summary. The premise was intriguing enough. But when it came down to it, the author’s name was the biggest factor. Because in Maggie we trust. And she came through with a good book.

Why I kept reading it: The name on the cover was the first factor. Maggie Stiefvater. She wrote one of my favorite books, The Scorpio Races. There was some pretty cover art: painting of a raven, an interesting symbol. It didn’t seem like the shelves of books with covers of girls in prom dresses, so I could walk around with this book and not be ashamed of the cover. The plotline seemed odd from the summary. The premise was intriguing enough. But when it came down to it, the author’s name was the biggest factor. Because in Maggie we trust. And she came through with a good book.

Who I would give it to next: The best thing about this book is that it’s not exclusively a girl book or a boy book. Boys or girls can pick it up and like it perfectly fine. There are guns and violence and quite a few punches, but there’s also magic, seeing into the future, and unraveling mysteries. It feels like Indiana Jones met Lord of the Rings and they weren’t quite sure how to get along. It’s a refresher from shelves full of exclusively girl-oriented or boy-oriented novels. I’ll give it to my brother and see if he likes it.

Reviewed by Disha T.

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