The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

 The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, originally published in 1925, is an “American Classic” that can still be enjoyed today by much of America’s modern youth. For those with an appreciation of the beauty and elegance so often associated with lifestyle before the Great Depression. Fitzgerald does an exquisite job of bringing the characters to life in such a way that demonstrates how the “roaring twenties” shaped their lives. The novel follows Nick Carraway in the summer of 1922 as he both stumbles and soars through trials of romance, deception, and action. One of the things that make The Great Gatsby so unique is that while the novel is told from Nick’s perspective, he does not end up seaming to be the main character; after all he is not for whom Fitzgerald named the book. This of course proves interesting, as the reader hears Nick’s thoughts and feelings despite the fact that it is not he on whom the novel focuses. Readers who fear of being bored with books that take to long to even begin to develop a plot have nothing to be concerned of with this novel. Fitzgerald jumps right in, beginning to set the stage for a wonderful story before you even turn the page. The Great Gatsby provides a wonderful sense of entertaining reliability with such tag-lines as “Old Sport” with out becoming overly predictable. Because it has elements of human nature that are timeless, this novel has survived decades in American bookstores shelves. For that reason, and many more, the human nature of this amazing novel makes it a necessary addition to American homes.

By OdesssaRose M.

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